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Inspiration Friday: The Moral Bucket List

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2018 GraduationMay 5th, 2018
6 months to go.
stumbleThis article, from the Sunday Review of the New York Times, is called “The Moral Bucket List.”    It begins, “ABOUT once a month I run across a person who radiates an inner light. These people can be in any walk of life. They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. You often catch them looking after other people and as they do so their laugh is musical and their manner is infused with gratitude. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all.”
The author goes on to say that there are “two sets of virtues, the résumé virtues and the eulogy virtues. The résumé virtues are the skills you bring to the marketplace. The eulogy virtues are the ones that are talked about at your funeral — whether you were kind, brave, honest or faithful. Were you capable of deep love?

We all know that the eulogy virtues are more important than the résumé ones. But our culture and our educational systems spend more time teaching the skills and strategies you need for career success than the qualities you need to radiate that sort of inner light. Many of us are clearer on how to build an external career than on how to build inner character.”

The article is worth a read.  It goes on to identify certain qualities that we all need to develop in order to life the life described above.  He refers to the philosophy that sustains them as a “philosophy of stumblers,” which I love.    He notes,  “Their lives often follow a pattern of defeat, recognition, redemption. They have moments of pain and suffering. But they turn those moments into occasions of radical self-understanding…  The people on this road see the moments of suffering as pieces of a larger narrative. They are not really living for happiness, as it is conventionally defined. They see life as a moral drama and feel fulfilled only when they are enmeshed in a struggle on behalf of some ideal.”

You can read the rest of the article here.  Article tip courtesy NDNU’s Spirituality Director Amy Jobin; thanks, Amy!

Image courtesy internetcafedevotions.com

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